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at film from august of 1963 as demonstration and marchers gathered on the mall here in washington d.c. this was the headline from the washington post, a mammoth rally of 200,000 jamming the mall in a solemn orderly plea for equality. that's our line for those of you over the age of 50. for those of you under the age of 50. 585-3880. 202 is the area code here in washington d.c. we'll get your call on march. >> your calls and comments in a moment. lots get to the other stories this morning that is latest development from syria and headlines from overseas. the guardian newspaper the attack on syria just days away as the house of commons recalled for a vote and the picture of the british prime minster as he departs yesterday as the parliament resuming session tomorrow breaking from their august recess. from the marine herald, -- miami herald, a stage is set. u.s. and allies act as syria's intelligence mount. as u.s. officials said privately that a flood of previously undisclosed intelligence including satellite images and intercepted communication erased last minute administration doubt
washington martha. she was always called patsy as lady bird johnson was never called claudia. so i was just wondering, you mentioned in his letters when he referred to her in his letter that it was just mentioned on the telephone that he did call her patsy. and i also wanted to mention that in the story that i'm reading about martha and george washington that the house, mt. vernon, was originally the home of his half brother, george washington's half brother. that he lived in a smaller farm. and i wondered if you are going to talk anything about his years as a surveyor or is this really about the years with martha as an adult? >> thank versus much. this is actually martha washington's time in the sun. so we won't talk about george's early career. what about the nickname patsy? >> patsy, pat, patty were the nicknames for martha in those days just as peg or peggy is a nickname for margaret. the martha nickname has fallen out of favor. nobody was named patricia back then. the only patsies were martha's. that was simply the common name. >> the smaller farm she's reference ing? >> smaller, it wa
anniversary of the march on washington. inside story is next. >>> 50 years after the march on washington there are lingering challenges to the modern social justice movement and a modern debathe as to how to accomplish dr. king's dream. this is inside story. hello everybody i'm david shuster, it was called a march for jobs and freedom. hundreds of thousands of peaceful protestors gathered on the national mall and ignited a new conversation about civil rights in america. highlighted by the march and by dr. martin luther king jr.'s i have a dream speech are still alive today. still ahead, we'll examine inquality and social justice. finally, we'll take you to an organizer who was there. joyce ladner. >> i had a stage pass. no one on that stage had ever seen that many people before. that's the major one memory. i have a lot of others as well. >> was it an energetic crowd? was it a me mesmerized crowd? >> it was a very friendly crowd. it was almost like meeting new friends. it was easy going. it was an easy crowd. >> was there a sense that eventually society would progress and things would ch
to come to washington. there will be those that will miscast this as some great social event. but let us remember 50 years ago some came to washington having rode the back of buses. some came to washington that couldn't stop and buy a cup of coffee until they got across the mason dixon line. some came to washington sleeping in their cars because they couldn't rent a motel room. some came to washington never having had the privilege to vote. some came having seen their friends shed blood. but they came to washington so we could come today in a different time and a different place and we owe them for what we have today. i et a man not long ago, tell it often, he says i'm african american but i don't understand all this civil rights marching you're talking about, reverend al. i've accomplished, i've achieved. look at my resume. i went to the best schools. i'm a member of the right clubs. i had the right people read my resume. civil rights didn't write my resume. i looked at his resume. i said, you're right. civil rights didn't write your resume. but civil rights made somebody ead your resum
it in 50 years. the 1963 march on washington. >> now back to roger mudd. >> here at the lincoln memorial, the sight that is almost something no washingtonian has beheld. >> news reports from the march along with coverage of the civil rights movement helped change minds about the protesters and the fight to end segregation. we'll talk with the reporters who were there, including dan rather, who reported for cbs news and paul delaney, a founding member of the national association of black journalists. >>> plus "the new york times" says espn dropped its partnership with public tv's "front line" when the nfl objected to a documentary about head injuries. does this show the influence sports leagues have over sports journali journalism's biggest player? >>> and are you one of the movie goers that made this the top-grossing film last weekend? >> there he is. what's your name sdm. >> cecil gaines. >> i'm carter wilson, head butler. >> did you know the story of "the butler" began with one reporter's quest for the ultimate white house insider? we'll talk with the "washington post"'s wil haygood ab
approaches this situation is a top priority. "the washington post" published something online that u.s.,s details about the that the budget has grown enormously since 9/11, that the cia is far bigger than outside experts had estimated, that the u.s. is involved in new cyber programs to attack other programs in countries. this information has never been released despite efforts from outside folks. does the president believe this is helpful now and the current climate to have discussion about the details about how the u.s. is spending its money in these departments to get a better understanding, as he said, make the public comfortable with how this money is being spayed and what type of programs are being used? -- that storyhed was published since i walked out here. i'm not in a position to comment on a specific story. the president believes that strengthening public confidence in these programs is important to the success of these programs. there is little debate about the fact these programs are critical to our national security, that they have made a role in protecting the homeland
to make the first march on washington and i never really got over that until president obama said please lead us in the invocation, and that was in january of this year. thank you reverend sharpton and others for asking me to lend a few words to this most precious gatheri gathering as i look out at the crowd, i find myself saying, what are we doing today? where have we come from? what has been accomplished and where do we go from this point forwa forward? i think of one theme that has been played over and over in the past few months and it's one that bring great controversy. stand your ground. and we can think of standing your ground in the negative, but i ask you today to flip that coin and make stand your ground a positive ring for all of us who believe in freedom and justice and equality, that we stand firm on the ground that we have already made and be sure that nothing is taken away from us because there are efforts to turn back the clock of freedom. and i ask you today will you allow that to happen? take the words "stand your ground" in a positive sense. stand your ground in terms
-perry. live this morning from washington, d.c. where thousands of people turned out to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the march on washington for jobs and freedom yesterday. only one man who spoke from the steps of the lincoln memorial five decades ago remains alive today, congressman john lewis, and he spoke forcefully. >> i got arrested 40 times during the '60s, beaten, left bloody and unconscious. but i'm not tired, i'm not weary. i'm not prepared to sit down and give up. i am ready to fight and continue the fight, and you must fight. >> although the architect of the march has passed away, many of the inequities that prompted the struggle remain firmly in place. in 1963 the march called for equal access to jobs, fair wages, unfettered voting rights and intraracial segregation, access to decent health care, schools, housing. half a century later the struggle continues. the struggle continues for decent work and humane conditions that pays a living wage of the nationwide unemployment rate is 7.4%. for african-americans it's 12.6%. for young african-american men between 20 and 24 the u
por espionaje... miles de estudiantes universitarios regresaran a clases en washington, pero recibiran un duro golpe en su economia.. y es que segun un informe, el costo para estacionarse en los planteles incrementara consideradamente... claudia uceda nos tiene los detalles.. daniel empieza su vida universitaria en la capital y aun no sabe si necesitara un auto. daniel aizenman/estudiante universitario " aun no tengo un plan, podria considerarlo." estos padres ya dejaron a su hijo en los dormitorios del campus de american university, ellos son conscientes que su hijo tendra que tomar decisiones. samuel aizenman/padre de daniel "me imagino que es el quien va a tener que lidiar con este costo. sabra si va a tener que tener carro, una bicicleta o nada ..." futuro que le puede costar muy caro a muchos estudiantes que llegan a la capital... ya que de acuerdo con la triple a los costos de los permisos para estacionar vehiculos en universidades han aumentado en algunos casos como un 80 porciento jeanette tejada/portavoz aaa "el estacionamiento es muy limitado y caro en washington dc..." el es
night at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span programs on every first lady from martha washington to ida mckinley. tonight, sarah polk, mark rhett taylor and abigail fillmore. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] sarah polk was on diplomacy and her strong suit is intelligence and political discussion. >> she made no bones about the fact she took an interest in politics. and that she was her husband's partner. >> she grew naup political household in tennessee. her father was a local politician so she grew up loving politics. she married james after he won a seat in the legislature. because she would not have married him if he had -- >> unfortunately for james k. polk he died three months after leaving the white house. and sarah began a 42-year widowhood. polk place became a shrine to her husband and she would invite anybody who wanted to to come to visit and see the objects she had collected through her long and illustrious political career. >> to live there for many years on her own. during the civil war, generals on both
, the struggles of yesterday, and as we're approaching the an vary of the march on washington we have to wonder if the goals of the march on washington were met over the past 50 years. the answer to that is no, they were not. we need people not only as young as my grandchildren, they're great kids, weren't they? not only kids as young as my grandchildren, but people as old as you and i are. we need to put our shoulders to the wheel, ge make sure the figt gets done. >> michael: i don't know what you meant by people as old as you and i, but thank you for coming. i really appreciate it. >>> i'm looking at you, john boehner, politicians are on summer break, and what better place than des moines, really? donnie fowler and my good friend ben mankiewicz will collectively shape their views on that with me. they'll also share them. and ro khama getting ready for the silicon valley house seat. and whether vacationing or campaigning, a book that every lawmaker should have on their summer reading list, a dream foreclosed. i'll talk to the author about the people she met and the courageous action they have
-span. programs on every first lady, from martha washington. tonight, elizabeth munro and catherine adams. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] ♪ >> elizabeth monroe was a true partner in her husband's career. they were a love story and absolutely devoted to each other. elizabeth monroe had a well- developed sense of style and image. this is a woman who knew how to carry herself with great elegance. >> it is called the era of good feeling. >> this is a woman who spoke french. >> very great beauty. she received is seldom anything in the white house. she hated it. >> dignity, civility. those are the words that come to mind. >> elizabeth monroe served as first lady from 1817 to 1825 as a time known as the era of good feeling. coming up, we will explore her life and what were not always happy times inside the white house for this woman born into a well-to-do new york family. she married james monroe at the age of 17 and traveled new york extensively with him. she brought with her to the white house a certain french
morning, august 15. ahead on the "washington journal ," your reaction to the latest development in egypt and what the u.s. response should be. you should join the conversation at (202) 585-3880, our line for republicans. (202) 585-3881 for democrats. we also have our line for independents at (202) 585-3882. join us on facebook, send us a tweet, or e-mail address, journal@c-span.org. at somegin with a look of the headlines from outside the u.s., the "guardian" newspaper -- egypt's bloody crackdown. when the story first went to prince, the death toll was 200 78. overnight, the death toll has been updated to 421. there is this from the "miami killed asundreds egypt's forces storm the protest camps. a similar headline from "usa today," egypt the reps in chaos. -- a reps and chaos. from the "wall street journal" website -- egypt's military regime a reps setting off a day of violence that left at least 421 people dead. the government fractured and ties with its international partners in tatters. cairo streets were calm this morning following the curfew overnight with funerals for the dead. fur
. ♪ [applause] >> thank you. 50 years ago, they did not take a bus outing to come to washington. there will be those that will miscast this as some great social event. but let us remember 50 years ago some came to washington having rode the back of buses. some came to washington that couldn't stop and buy a cup of coffee until they got across the mason dixon line. some came to washington sleeping in their cars because they couldn't rent a motel room. some came to washington never having had the privilege to vote. some came having seen their friends shed blood. but they came to washington so we could come today in a different time and a different place and we owe them for what we have today. [applause] i met a man not long ago, i tell it often, he says i'm african american but i don't understand all this civil rights marching you're talking about, reverend al. i've accomplished, i've achieved. look at my resume. i went to the best schools. i'm a member of the right clubs. i had the right people read my resume. civil rights didn't write my resume. i looked at his resume. i said, y
>>> coming up, 50 years after dr. king's historic speech in washington, kim lawton reports on an interfaith effort at reconciliation in the community torn by the trayvon martin tragedy. >> how do you judge the content of a person's character? >> and from north carolina, lucky severson has the story of a protest movement called moral monday. >> forward together, not one step back! >> immore monday is a term i have used, and i do believe it is true. >>> major funding for "religion and ethics newsweekly" is provided by the lilly endowment, an indianapolis based private family foundation dedicated to its founders' interest in religion, community development, and education. additional funding also provided by mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. and the corporation for public broadcasting. >>> welcome. i'm fred de sam lazaro sitting in for bob be aer thety. thank you for joining us. religion groups are among those marking the 50th anniversary of the march on washington with a series of events
in the 1963 march on washington remember the events of that day in a discussion hosted by the martin luther king, jr. memorial library in washington, d.c. this is an hour 30 minutes. >> when our archivist suggested that i conduct oral histories with people that attended the march, i jumped at the opportunity to hear firsthand accounts of the days that i, like many of you, had only known about in books, photos and media reflections. i was curious about literal and other journeys that people took to get to the lincoln memorial on that hot august day in 1963. we put out a call for people it into the march to be interviewed and the panelists here today were the first to answer that call. it is important to note that this is the beginning of an ongoing project and derek and our collection not only oral histories but also memorabilia and other artifacts from the march to the washingtonian the community archive. two of the panelists, peter bailey and doctor ella kelly were right under my nose as their regular attendees to the black studies lecture series that takes place in the black study center
which found the unemployment rate went up in 28 state and declined in eight states. "washington journal" is next. >> the president's plan to try to keep college more affordable is already getting some reaction from capitol hill. we might have to weigh in. some are in support and some are critical saying the new ranging system that the president put out is arbitrary. meantime college can cost up to $30,000 year on average now for some folks and the debt load students carrying can be the same amount. with that background is the cost of college worth it? that's the question for you this friday morning. republicans call 202-585-3881, democrats 202-585-3880 and independents 202-585-3882. look forward to your calls and also your participation by social media. you can send us a tweet at twitter @c-span wj. you can also send an e-mail journal@c-span.org. is the cost of college worth it? allen writes, it used to be but right now it slightly losing steam. now people that are caught with a minimum of expectations while being strapped with a new burden of paying back the loan making short m
anniversary of the march on washington. wasn't it exciting to see the enthusiasm and the film of the people of the day? who could have expected so many of us would be here who had ties to all that was owing on? who could suspect that we would all be with john lewis? [applause] attorney general, mr. mayor, you honor us with your presence. .he fierce urgency of now words rang out across the national mall, the call echoed in households across america. the summons ignited a movement to make real the promise of democracy. of course everyone knows the "i had a dream" speech, but the fierce urgency of now part of it was not only an inspiration, it was a motivation to act. was not the first time dr. martin luther king jr. urged fellow travelers to reject the status quo, to in his words at the march, refuse to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. seven years early now to trim of in francisco, my hometown, 1956, dr. king delivered the same message to the delegates of the naacp convention. --said "now i realize those all over are telling us we must slow up, he said, but we cannot afford this slo
his vacation from the war room inside the war room and from washington, we also have mother jones magazine dark money reporter andy krohl. is this kind of hinge illegal, unethical, is it just a coincidence, bad judgment on booker's part, a combination of all of it. when i read this story, i thought that it was one of the most corrupt schemes to deliver personal money to a u.s. senate candidate that i've seen in a long time. what do you think? volunteer well, i think it raises a whole bunch of red flags about cory booker, and about how he interacts with the people who, you know, both people that he, who's interests he could be legislating or deciding on if he does become -- does he does go to congress, and also just issues about who funds his campaign. there are so may be murky overlaps here and ethical trip wires, if you will, about this whole, you know, you tube wanna-be venture that he is a part of. you also saw that the john of jeff zuker, the head of cnn, his 14-year-old son was on the board and had stock options for this company, as well. now i see the news coming out later t
, that is the future we must move toward no matter where it is. tom foreman, cnn, washington. >>> hello, again, a look at our top stories now. in california, a raging wildfire is exploding in size and spreading inside the yosemite national park. it has been 50 years on the east coast since martin luther king jr. made his famous speech and thousands today are gathering on the washington mall to secelebre that historic event and marian berry joining us live later on this hour. in california, a wildfire is burning almost out of control through parts of the state. the rim fire is burning so fast, it has doubled in size in a day. the fire has also spread to the western edge of the park. nick has been following developments for us. >> reporter: fred, is sun has come up here and it's given us a fresh perspective of how devastating the fire has been. this goes back a couple hundred yards at least and it's going things like this, scorching the earth and singeing the edges. at least 126,000 acres burned and it's been very unforgiving in its pattern. you see here, fire completely jumped over this road, scorched
, extra, read all about it! "washington post" has been sold! whoa! hey, good morning, everybody. nation's capital waking up to that shocking bit of news this morning and people all around the country talking about it, as well. good morning, good morning, great to see you. it's a tuesday. tuesday, august 6th, in fact. and we are here in our nation's capital, booming out to you all across this great land of ours on your local progressive talk radio station, lucky if you've got one and give them your full support and on current tv for another week and a day here. and we're glad to be with you whether you're watching or listening, keep up with us here on the "full court press" and join the conversation. because our job is to let you know what's going on this morning here in our nation's capital, around the country and around the globe. your job is to tell us what you think about it all. and what you think we ought to be doing about it. 1-866-55-press is your ticket. that's our toll free number. 1-866-55-press. and then you go on twitter, if you prefer. give us your comments at bpshow or on
of dictator throwing thunder bolts out of the sky in washington. he's not. this is a federal system and that means the states are involved. and that's as it should be. and i think more power to him -- or more kudos to had him for wanting to do it that way. some states are participating in the health care markets. some are not. the feds will do it if the states don't. on immigration, there's a role for the states and i think it is going to be an ecpabded role for the states in any kind of reform. on health care, the interesting thing to me is that the business -- a lot of the business community wants obama care to go through. by business community, i mean hospitals, insurers, health care networks, they want more customers. so they went to this republican red state governor and said, you know what? this is pro business. be for it. and she was. >> i think to howard's point, the notion that no good deed goes unpunished. jan brewer is expanding the medical roles which i think is a very good move. there's very little that i think jan brewer does that's good. this is a good thing. low-inco
organized a march on washington. he buys black, gay, and a pacifist. he will be honored with the posthumous medal of freedom. naegle,speak to walter and john d'emilio, author of "lost prophet: the life and times of bayard rustin." all that and more coming up. to democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. a u.s. drone strike killed two people in yemen on saturday. the u.s. has now carried out nine drone strikes in two weeks, killing 38 people. it is the most concentrated series of drone strikes in a decade. yemeni official told cnn the number of strikes was actually 12 and nearly a dozen of those killed were believed to be innocent. the united states has reopened 18 of the 19 diplomatic posts in the middle east and north africa due to an alleged threat. the embassy in yemen will remain closed, as well as the one in pakistan to to an unrelated threat. the guardian newspaper has revealed the national security agency has a backdoor into its databases come along and to search the e-mails and phone calls of americans without warrants. a previously undisclosed rule change allows o
. >> announcer: from nbc news in washington, the world's longest-running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> straight to the breaking news. a heavy security presence in cairo, egypt, this morning as military rulers are trying to strengthen their control over a country descending into chaos. so, how much worse will it get in egypt? hundreds are dead, nearly 40 christian churches have been torched and looted, and supporters of the ousted president morsi, the muslim brotherhood, are vowing to fight back. we'll have a live report coming up from cairo in just a moment, but back here in washington, the critical question is, are u.s. taxpayers, in effect, footing the bill for the continuing violence? joining me now, two members of the senate armed services committee, democrat jack reed of rhode island and republican kelly ayotte of new hampshire. senators, welcome to you both. senator ayotte, straight to you. several weeks ago, this question came up -- should we keep the u.s. aid flowing to egypt? you said yes then. have you had a change of heart now? >> well, i think, david, in lig
a moment, but back here in washington, the critical question is, are u.s. taxpayers, in effect, footing the bill for the continuing violence? joining me now, two members of the senate armed services committee, democrat jack reed of rhode island and republican kelly ayotte of new hampshire. senators, welcome to you both. senator ayotte, straight to you. several weeks ago, this question came up -- should we keep the u.s. aid flowing to egypt? you said yes then. have you had a change of heart now? >> well, i think, david, in light of recent actions, we tried to give some time to the administration. they obviously tried to get the military government to not crack down in a violent way, to restore democracy, to move to elections, to release political prisoners. they have ignored all of those requests. and now with the recent violent crackdown, i do not see how we can continue aid. i believe it must be suspended because, unfortunately, i think the military's gotten the impression, and particularly with what the president not asking for aid to be suspended when he spoke this week, that whateve
march on y of the washington. we will be joined by clarence lusane. ♪ashingt"washington journal" is. host: the lincoln memorial, a key part of the march 50 years ago, a key part of the event today. commemorating the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. live coverage starts at nine on c-span three, part of american history tv. we will devote part of this program to the topic of the march, as well as the civil rights act. for the first 45 minutes we are turning to politics. john boehner, in a conference call with republican lawmakers, told a group he plans to craft a short-term bill that would fund the government, avoiding a government shutdown. for our next 45 minutes, we are interested in hearing from republicans only. the acttalk about itself, the larger implications of the funding of the health- care law, but we want to get your thoughts on our phone line. here's how you can do so. it is republicans only. if you live in the eastern and central time zone, it is 202- 585-3880. if you live in the pacific or mountain time zone, it is 202- 585-3881. you can reach us on twitter
this country and to mark the 50th anniversary of the march on washington, and the good saturday afternoon to you, everyone. i am craig melvin coming live from the feet of the lincoln memorial continuing our coverage. we heard speech from civil rights and political leaders ranging from attorney general eric holder of course here and house speaker -- house minority leader nancy pelosi and the families of trayvon martin and of course martin luther king iii scheduled to join us at some point here over the next hour or so, and again right now thousands about to start retracing the steps that marchers took 50 years ago. so has peter alexander who is along the march route and let me start with you. what is the scene like right now? >> so right now we're along the route on independence avenue and you can see the police are clearing the way as they arrive here at the martin luther king memorial. we are joined by so many people who witnessed history as we wait to see those who participated in it, one of those voices is the gentleman i met today named franklin delano, no roosevelt, but williams. you
on the washington debate. thank you both very much for your time this morning. >> thank you. >> let me bring in richard engel, our chief foreign correspondent, on the ground in cairo, as well as senior fellow at the woodrow wilson center, robin wright, an expert on the broader middle east for context here. richard, your reporting has been compelling from the chaotic streets of cairo. given your sense of things, where is this headed? >> reporter: well, i think a lot of it depends on what happens in washington. and just to continue on the debate you were just having, people in this country and around the region think it would be an absolutely disastrous idea for the united states to cut off aid, that washington has real interests with the egyptian military, preferential access to the suez canal, military overflights, and not to mention the camp david accords. the camp david accords brokered by the united states, the peace agreement between israel and egypt, says in principle that u.s. aid should be commensurate between israel, from washington to israel and from washington to egypt. and does th
goose bumps. and you can't help but become emotional. the mall in washington today is packed with people from all over the country. thousands of people who made this journey on the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. the national mall is filled. you can see the reflecting pool and the monument in the background. then over my shoulder, the lincoln memorial where we have been hearing performances all day which will culminate with the president of the united states. the first african-american president giving his speech on the anniversary. i am don lemon, everyone. we're going to hear from three presidents this afternoon. former president jimmy carter will speak. as well as former president bill clinton will speak here as well. then, of course, president barack obama. plus, civil rights icon, congress n congressman john lewis, the only surviving speaker from the 1963 march on washington will deliver his remarks. first we'll hear from superstar oprah winfrey. oprah is scheduled to speak any minute now. we wait for oprah winfrey and others to take to the podium, and they will begin t
. this is the "full court press" coming to you live on current tv from our studio on capitol hill in washington, d.c. good to see you this morning and good to have you with us and welcome to washington and the summer in washington where it's kind of a ghost town with the congress out of town and the president out of town. he spent the night in los angeles. he will be down at camp pendleton later this afternoon. we will bring you up to date on the news of the day and take your calls at 1-866-55-press. look forward to hearing from you on twitter at bpshow and on facebook at facebook.com/billpressshow. in the news today, of course, everybody still buzzing about the fact that "the washington post" was sold. could "the new york times" be next? that's what people are asking. and around washington, the most common reaction is well, jeff bezos bought it, at least it wasn't rupert murdoch or the koch brothers. good news on the child obesity front. give some credit to first lady michelle obama. pardon me. oh, my god, i don't think i've ever done that on television before but for the first time ever -- not e
. "washington journal" is next. ♪ good morning. august 12, 20 13. attorney general eric holder is set to announce that low-level, nonviolent drug offenders will no longer be charged minimum mandatory sentence -- sentences. it is part of an overall package to reform american prisons. he will make the remarks at the american bar association today in san francisco. we want to begin there. what is your take on the attorney general's proposal to reform the prison system in this country? republicans -- democrats -- independents -- you can send us a tweet if you go to twitter.com @cspanwj. on our facebook page, facebook.com/c-span. or e-mail us. we will begin with the front page of the "washington post" -- this is what the attorney general is going to propose, that low-level, nonviolent drug offenders with no ties to gangs or large-scale drug organizations will no longer be charged with offenses that impose severe mandatory sentences. it goes on to say it goes on to say we want to get your thoughts on this. what do you think about the attorney general setting this forward? this is his goal.
the broadcast the washington post reports the national security agency has broken privacy rules or overstepped its legal authority thousands of times each year since it was given broad new spy powers by congress in 2008. in a separate post story, the leader of the secret court that supposed to oversee the spy program says its ability to do so is limited and that it must trust the government to report when it improperly spies on americans. we will have more on the story with alexander abdo after the headlines. reuters is reporting edward snowden began downloading documents related to widespread u.s. spying while working for dell last april, almost a year earlier than has previously been reported breed prior stories have focused on snow and subsequent three-month stint with contractor booz allen hamilton holding. snowden said that people associate with his father have, in his words, misled journalists into printing false claims about my situation. snowden said neither his father nor his father's lawyer nor his lawyer's wife and spokesperson represent him in any way. in lebanon, a car bomb tore t
is speak the truth. secondly, there is a new generation of leaders stepping forward in washington. new, young at leaders, people like rand paul and marco rubio and mike lee and kelly ayotte. [applause] you know what is incredible? five years ago, not one of them was in office. you have to go back to after world war ii to see an instance where the generation of leaders who were effectively defending free-market principles is a new generation stepping forward -- let me suggest something. if you look at that new generation, they are almost always exactly the same age. was 10 whence, i ronald reagan became president. i was 18 when ronald reagan left the white house. know how for the world war ii generation, many of them would prefer to fdr as "our president?" i will go to my grave with ronald reagan defining what it means to be present. -- president. [applause] he didn't blink. i have referred to this next generation, this new generation as the children of reagan. listen to them communicate. listen to kelly stand up and talk about free-market principles. listen to marco. listen to rent. --
of freedom. we will talk about who he was as we move in on the 50th anniversary of the march on washington, which he organized. ♪ [music break] >> this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. white house has announced it will posthumously award the highest civilian honor in the united states come the presidential medal of freedom, to civil rights activist bayard rustin. obama will award him and 16 others at the white house later this year. in his own day, bayard rustin was a minority within the minority who tirelessly agitated for change. , awas an african-american gay man fighting against homophobia, and a pacifist fighting against endless war. he was a key advisor to martin luther king and introduced him to teachings of gondi and nonviolence. he helped to found the southern leadership conference. he was later the chief organizer of the historic march on washington for jobs and freedom, rallying hundreds of thousands of people for economic justice, full employment voting rights, and people opportunity. >> segregation shall be ended in every distri
canceled his meeting with russian president vladimir putin. that is all next on "washington journal." ♪ is sunday,orning, it august 11 come up 20 13. it is today, resident obama began his week long vacation at martha's vineyard. today we will be discussing the state of u.s. relations with dive intoking a deep u.s. job numbers, and talking about recent al qaeda threats. before we do that we want to hear about the state of news media from our viewers. the pew research center's -- you research center released its biannual data and while there is still plenty of criticism about the industry, most americans continue to believe the media plays an important watchdog role. as we take you through that reports this morning, we want to hear your thoughts. he of us a call. we split our lineup -- we split our lines up by age group. you can also catch up with us on all of your favorite social media sites, on twitter and facebook. you can also e-mail us at .ww.c-span.org we want to take you to that report that was released on thursday by the pew research center for the people. public valuations
perez. o'bryan.teve ♪ tot: good morning, welcome "the washington journal." we are in the waning days of a congressional recess and members of congress are gearing up for this fall's legislative agenda. a question for all of you this morning, what is your message to house and senate lawmakers as they prepare to turn to -- returned to washington next month. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. also send as a tweet, if you go to twitter.com/c-spanwj or post your comments on facebook.com/cspan or e-mail us at journal@c-span.org. a piece this morning from janet hauck, a town hall meetings happening across the country, this is what she reports -- of color that is a bit on what is happening in town hall meetings across the country. here on c-span we have been those town hall meetings and if you are interested in watching them, you can go to c-span.org. before we came up live here we were showing you a recent town hall meeting with congressman justin [indiscernible] a republican who many of you know is against the nsa program. nsa,
's daylong march on washington, celebrating 19630th anniversary of the march on washington. welcome to "washington journal" on the sunday, august 25, 2013. we will play you a couple of more comments from yesterday's speech. the question this morning, does new technology create better jobs? we will show you the opinion piece that is prompting our question. here are a couple of ways to participate in the discussion, as usual. by phone -- make sure you mute your television or radio when you call in. you can reach us on twitter or facebook. or send journal@c-span.org us an e-mail, the e-mail address is -- or send us an e-mail, the address is journal@c-span.org. the front page this morning of t,"e washington pos the headline -- part of the reporting this morning area did president obama will be speaking on the actual anniversary day at the lincoln memorial. that is coming up on wednesday. here's the front page of the new york times and their front page photo from the march yesterday -- e froml play you mor that. comeshnology and jobs, it in an opinion peas from "the new york times," wri
structure remains shrouded in mystery. tom foreman, washington. >> of course the great irony using so much american innovation to try to destroy america. "outfront" next why dr. sanjay gupta change ed his mind on weed. an about-face and he h eel explain why. >>> then are you driving a compact car that failed a crash test? we have the alarming results. >>> and a double play. he made the catch but what he did next was the true score. [ male announcer ] these days, a small business can save by sharing. like carpools... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer ] ...office space. yes, we're loving this communal seating. it's great. [ male announcer ] the best thing to share? a data plan. at&t mobile share for business. one bucket of data for everyone on the plan, unlimited talk and text on smart phones. now, everyone's in the spirit of sharing. hey, can i borrow your boat this weekend? no. [ male announcer ] share more. save more. at&t mobile share for business. ♪ >>> our fourth story "outfront," dr. sanjay gupta changes his mind on weed. washi
on washington, new civil rights leaders descend on the lincoln memorial where martin luther king, jr. once told us he had a dream. >> come on, let's go! >>> the fast-moving wildfire that has consumed 165 square miles has entered yosemite national park. and having doubled in size in just one day, it's now bearing down on thousands of structures. >>> she was tried, convicted and monday she'll be back in court. now jane velez-mitchell reveals new details about jodi arias that show how a previous boyfriend may have narrowly escaped her clutches. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm brianna kheiler. >> and i'm ivan watson. it's 10:00 p.m. on the east coast, 7:00 on the west. and you're in the cnn newsroom. >> let freedom ring. >> and we begin this hour with history being made again today in the nation's capital. >> that's right. marchers are retracing the landmark 1963 march on washington. it was 50 years ago wednesday that the reverend martin luther king, jr. called for an end to hatred and bigotry in his "i have a dream" speech. >> chris is on the mall. chris, participants are exchanging words, but the
is to prevent chemical weapons from being deployed. >> mike viquera in washington. >>> opposition leader general sallim edris about the three-year conflict. must aftoustapha helped organiz trip. thank you for being with us. >> thank you. >> did senator john mccain indicate any american involvement during that trip back in may? >> during his trip, senator mccain, who had been long an advocate for greater leadership in the forklift of syria, on behalf of the syrian revolution and the people discussed the need for greater leadership and intervention by the united states but stated the sort of political realities in washington and that at the end of the day, the decision remains the president's, but he assured in multiple meetings including with general hadris that he continued to work in congress and in the senate to add more pressure on administration to act. >> have members of congress been in contact since the alleged checkcal we hope attack >> as far as i know, since the weaponstac that happened a few days ago, there has been no contact between members of congress and him directly, but i wouldn
the argument that the world needs to do something but only to a opinion. patty culhane. al jazeera washington. >> mike, the administration direction has changed drastically, what happened? >> that is a testament to not only the power of the images, the horrific images but the testament to the power and ability to distribute those images. remember this happened last wednesday. thursday the president gave an uf statement that says we need to act within the auspices of international law. then the need for international inspectors, then the images continued to pour in. the international investigators set, assad needs to let the investigators in. the administration says there is little doubt that assad was responsible then yesterday we heard that extremely strong statements from secretary kerry in part to galvanize public opinion where he called it a moral obscenity and culminated by today where joe biden said there's no doubt the assad regime is responsible. >> mike, the american people are wary of any military involvement in syria. how does the president sell this military action? >> what's impo
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